Neil Pasricha’s article in the Harvard Business Review has eight great suggestions on time management and organization:

  1. Centralize reading in your home,
  2. Make a public commitment,
  3. Find a few trusted lists,
  4. Change your mindset about quitting,
  5. Channel your reading dollars,
  6. Triple your churn rate,
  7. Read physical books, and
  8. Reapply the 10,000 steps rule.

The article, of course, expands on these points with explanations and ideas for practical application. Be forewarned, however, that the Harvard Business Review limits the number of articles you can view for free, so if you’ve already exhausted that, you may not be able to access the link.

A version of How to Read a Book by Mortimer J. Adler is available in PDF format from the Everglades High School website. Though not the same one I have in my library — this one is geared towards reading the Great Books — it still contains a lot of information that would be useful to high school students, or to anyone who loves to read but feels they might be missing something in the approach.

What I love about this book is that it discusses how to read books on different subjects. Of course you don’t read a science book in the same way you read a novel, but what exactly is the difference? Well, now you know. Not only is it illuminating, it’s also a relief. It took almost no time at all for me to realize why I had such trouble making heads or tails of such works. I look forward to diving into them now!

Though I really suggest you part with the ten bucks or so for the actual print book, this PDF version will give you a great idea of what to look forward to.